day tripper

Ask me anything   Blah blah blah.

people:watch your language
me:oh shit sorry
— 4 days ago with 185183 notes

thecutestofthecute:

English Bulldog puppy at the sea

(Source: siduslucida.com, via honestmoon)

— 3 weeks ago with 140044 notes

lascapigliata:

turns my fan on high so i can still sleep with a blanket

(via bigdaddylena)

— 3 weeks ago with 90388 notes

fawnah:

I take a nap and I wake up as the grinch or an angel there is actually no between

(via littleallyson)

— 1 month ago with 26 notes

ccmadbox:

i live in constant struggle between “you’re wrong” and “but i don’t want to start shit”

(via craaazylove)

— 1 month ago with 189129 notes

brititch:

hell is a room where the wallpapers are all your failed selfies

(Source: wigwams, via honestmoon)

— 1 month ago with 15366 notes

spenceromg:

do your eyes ever randomly go out of focus and then you are too lazy to focus them back in and just stare at nothing for a while

(via honestmoon)

— 1 month ago with 601487 notes
"With the right music, you either forget everything or you remember everything."
Unknown (via laffycathy)

(Source: alexbost, via craaazylove)

— 1 month ago with 184644 notes
"I think, long distant relationships
are for people with patience
are for people who trust
are for conversation lovers
are for metaphysical touchers
are for sharers of their secrets
are for people who can afford them
are for people who love solitude
are for lovers who know their love
can thrive with much absent, I think."

"Star-Crossed Lovers of Space" by Joseph Cook (via lnkdroptheory)

"for lovers who know their love"

amen

(via youngblackandvegan)

(Source: jnc-ink, via bigdaddylena)

— 1 month ago with 1824 notes
mrgolightly:




What I love about Betty’s depression is that there isn’t a firm reason for it. Many TV shows would say, “Oh, she had a controlling first husband” or “She had a bad relationship with her mother” or “She’s stifled by her life as a housewife.” Mad Men says it’s all of those things, but it also says that there’s something undefined about it. Betty will never be whole. She’s always going to be looking for a magic fix that won’t come, and even Henry—who really does love her unconditionally—is someone she’ll push away in bitterness, just because she doesn’t know many other ways to relate to people. When the series started, it seemed like Betty was going to fill the show’s “housewife becomes feminist” role, but she didn’t really do that. Instead, she increasingly became isolated, both because of things others did to her and things she did herself. She was miserable, and maybe she’ll always be miserable. The show teases us with the idea that she’ll someday become a “better” person, as if that means anything, but I think it’s clear, now, that she won’t, at least by the standards we’d like to put on her. Nothing will ever quite fill the hole. (x)



This is why Betty is one of my all time favorite television characters. There’s no back story given that explains why she’s such an ice princess or why she’s constantly unhappy. Usually, writers feel the need, especially for female characters, to include a reason for why a certain character is bitter or evil or discontent or whatever, but in Betty’s case, she just is. I hope that in the final episodes of Mad Men there isn’t some sudden explanation for why she is the way she is, because that would take away from what makes her so great.

mrgolightly:

What I love about Betty’s depression is that there isn’t a firm reason for it. Many TV shows would say, “Oh, she had a controlling first husband” or “She had a bad relationship with her mother” or “She’s stifled by her life as a housewife.” Mad Men says it’s all of those things, but it also says that there’s something undefined about it. Betty will never be whole. She’s always going to be looking for a magic fix that won’t come, and even Henry—who really does love her unconditionally—is someone she’ll push away in bitterness, just because she doesn’t know many other ways to relate to people. When the series started, it seemed like Betty was going to fill the show’s “housewife becomes feminist” role, but she didn’t really do that. Instead, she increasingly became isolated, both because of things others did to her and things she did herself. She was miserable, and maybe she’ll always be miserable. The show teases us with the idea that she’ll someday become a “better” person, as if that means anything, but I think it’s clear, now, that she won’t, at least by the standards we’d like to put on her. Nothing will ever quite fill the hole. (x)

This is why Betty is one of my all time favorite television characters. There’s no back story given that explains why she’s such an ice princess or why she’s constantly unhappy. Usually, writers feel the need, especially for female characters, to include a reason for why a certain character is bitter or evil or discontent or whatever, but in Betty’s case, she just is. I hope that in the final episodes of Mad Men there isn’t some sudden explanation for why she is the way she is, because that would take away from what makes her so great.

(Source: madmen-caps)

— 1 month ago with 5993 notes